Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Carrot Cake Macaroons—with video! (AIP, Paleo, Vegan)

Carrot Cake Macaroons (AIP, Paleo, Vegan)

It had been ages, and ages since I made coconut macaroons… I had forgotten what a fun, bit-sized treat they are, and how easy it is to make them!

Carrot Cake Macaroons (AIP, Paleo, Vegan)

With Easter coming up this weekend, I wanted to create a macaroon that mimicked the flavor of a classic Easter favorite: carrot cake. Adding grated carrot, spices, and raisins to the macaroon base recipe worked great! As a bonus, including vegetables in dessert ups the nutrient profile just a bit and helps me feel better about the occasional indulgence. I love creating treats that mimic “the real deal,” but are more healthful and won’t derail my diet and lifestyle choices.


Also, I’ve created another recipe video to show just how easily these macaroons can be made :)

Carrot Cake Macaroons (AIP, Paleo, Vegan)

A note about my recipes: I ALWAYS recommend baking by weighted measurements to ensure the most successful baked goods. I've included volume measures, but they have been determined by math and are not tested. 

Carrot Cake Macaroons
yields 20 macaroons

120 grams (1 1/2 cups) unsweetened finely shredded coconut flakes
1 grams (1 tablespoon) coconut flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground mace (or sub nutmeg, if not AIP)
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
50 grams (1/2 cup) finely grated carrot
28 grams (2 tablespoons) melted coconut oil
78 grams (1/4 cup) Grade B maple syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
40 grams (1/2 cup) raisins

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking pan (I used a half sheet) with parchment paper
  2. In a food processor, pulse together the coconut flakes, coconut flour, cinnamon, mace, cloves and sea salt to combine everything. 
  3. Add the grated carrot, and pulse just until the carrot is distributed throughout. 
  4. Pour the coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract over the coconut mixture. Pulse until combined. 
  5. Transfer to a separate bowl and stir in the raisins.
  6. Use a 1 tablespoon cookie scoop, packed with dough, to portion the macaroons onto the parchment lined pan. 
  7. Bake for 8 minutes in the preheated oven, rotate the pan, and bake for an additional 7 minutes. Remove from the oven & allow the macaroons to cool completely on the pan. 
  8. Store leftovers in an airtight container. The macaroons may lose their crispness over time, depending on the humidity. 

Notes:

  • You can substitute honey for the maple syrup, though they will not longer be vegan.  
  • I do NOT recommend reducing the sweetener or swapping it for a non-liquid one, or else the macaroons will not hold together. 
Carrot Cake Macaroons (AIP, Paleo, Vegan)

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Friday, March 31, 2017

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)

I went AIP before the big “avocado toast” craze began; however, thanks to Mission Heirloom’s Yucan Crunch crackers, I’ve been able to enjoy my own allergen-friendly version.

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)


In December 2015, I had the pleasure of visiting Mission Heirloom in Berkeley, CA. Various AIP friends had highly recommended the paleo restaurant with many AIP options, but they also raved about Yucan Crunch crackers. I made it a point to try the Yucan Crunch and absolutely loved it—they really remind me of triscuits. I bought a bag on the spot & used it for breakfasts and snacks throughout the rest of our trip.

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)

Fast forward to now and I’m still a huge Yucan Crunch fan. After my initial stash ran out, I ordered it several more times from the Mission Heirloom website, but luckily, procuring some is even easier these days because Yucan Crunch is now available on Amazon! And they're even Amazon Prime eligible!

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)

To celebrate the Amazon debut of Yucan Crunch, I’m sharing my super easy avocado “toast” recipe. This is another recipe that almost isn’t a recipe due to how simple it is. But goodness, it is so tasty & really feels like a treat when I make it. Most often I’ll have the avocado toast plain, but it’s also delicious topped with smoked salmon or prosciutto.

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)

Mission Heirloom has graciously agreed to give one of my readers FREE 4-pack of Yucan Crunch. Leave a commend on this post sharing how you'd most like to use Yucan Crunch crackers. This giveaway is only open to US residents and will run until Monday April 10, 2017.


Disclosure: I did receive a complimentary 4-pack of Yucan Crunch; however, this is a product I have happily purchased in the past & will continue to purchase in the future. I would never recommend a product I didn’t stand behind 100%. 

Avocado “Toast" 
yields 1 serving

1 avocado
juice from 1/4 lemon
Yucan Crunch, broken into large (or small) pieces
truffle salt, as needed (or other finishing salt of your choice.

  1. In a small bowl, mash the avocado with the lemon juice. 
  2. Spread the avocado/lemon mixture onto pieces of Yucan Crunch
  3. Sprinkle with truffle salt. Eat immediately :) 

Note: some people prefer to toast their Yucan Crunch in a skillet or under the broiler, but I most often prefer it un-toasted. Feel free to do either, depending on your own preferences. Please DO NOT toast it in an actual toaster, as it could cause a fire if pieces break off into the toaster. 

Avocado “Toast” + a Yucan Crunch giveaway (AIP & Paleo)
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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo), with video

Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo)

My husband loves to make (and eat) corned beef and cabbage, with carrots & potatoes for St. Patrick’s Day. Once we got married, I started making gluten-free Irish soda bread to contribute to the festivities—we quite often host friends for this epic meal :) Last year, I experimented last minute with making a paleo Irish soda bread that only needed eggs as an AIP reintroduction. It was OK, but not as tasty and I’d liked and it was really really crumbly… Plus, I really wanted to figure out a version that people still in the elimination phase of AIP could enjoy too. This year, I went completely back to the drawing board and came up with this recipe I’m sharing today.

Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo)

Now, as with pretty much all AIP versions of baked goods, keep an open mind when trying this recipe… By keeping this recipe elimination phase compliant, I’ve worked with some pretty strict ingredient limitations, and to be honest, it has been a couple years since I’ve had “real” Irish soda bread to compare my version to. But I have come up with what I consider to be a pretty delicious, fairly close to the real deal option.

Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo)

This AIP Irish soda bread tastes the best & has the best texture the day it’s baked. However, since I also don’t recommend eating an entire loaf in one day by yourself, it does make some pretty epic toast slathered in fruit-sweetened jam (like the St. Dalfour apricot in these photos) the following day…. Just make sure to toast it in a gluten-free toaster/toaster oven or under the broiler.

Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo)

Also, since I know AIP baking can be more challenging than regular baking, I’ve created my first recipe-tutorial video detailing how I make this Irish Soda Bread. Check it out below, or on YouTube. Happy baking!



Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo) 

8 fl oz (1 cup), plus 1-2 additional teaspoons coconut milk 
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar  
75 g (2/3 cup) coconut flour  
80 g (2/3 cup) tapioca starch  
85 g (2/3 cup) arrowroot  
1 tablespoon gelatin  
1 tablespoon coconut sugar 
1 teaspoon AIP baking powder (see recipe below) 
1 teaspoon baking soda  
1/2 teaspoon sea salt  
48 g (4 tablespoons) palm shortening  
80 g (1/2 c) zante currants
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 F. Line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper—I used a quarter sheet
  2. Measure the coconut milk into a liquid measuring cup. Add the apple cider vinegar. Set aside to make faux “buttermilk.”  
  3. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the coconut flour, tapioca starch, arrowroot, gelatin, coconut sugar, AIP baking powder, baking soda, and salt until evenly combined. 
  4. Add the palm shortening to the mixing bowl. Use a fork or pastry blender to work the shortening in to the dry ingredients. Continue until the ingredients resemble coarse meal. 
  5. Pour in the coconut milk/vinegar. Stir with a silicone spatula or wooden spoon. Once mostly combined, switch to hand kneading until the dough can be squeezed together to form a ball. If needed, add additional coconut milk 1 tablespoon at a time (adding a maximum of 2 tablespoons). The finished bread will have the best texture with the least amount of coconut milk added, but the dough does need to be able to form into a ball that doesn’t completely break apart. 
  6. Form the dough into a disc & place on the prepared baking sheet. Use a serrated knife (I have this one) to cut an X in the center of the dough—the X allows heat to better penetrate to the center of the bread as it bakes. 
  7. Place the pan in the pre-heated oven & bake for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, rotate the pan and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, or until the center X is dry & the bread is golden. 
  8. Remove the finished bread from the oven & allow to cool completely before slicing. This bread has the best texture the day it is made, but it also makes excellent toast the following day. Store any leftovers, wrapped, at room temperature.
AIP/Paleo Baking Powder
81 grams (1/2 cup) cream of tartar 
55 grams (1/4 cup) baking soda
30 grams (1/4 cup) arrowroot or tapioca 
  1. Sift together the cream of tartar, baking soda, and arrowroot/tapioca.
  2. Store in an airtight jar. Use wherever baking powder is used.
Irish Soda Bread (AIP & Paleo) 
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Monday, February 27, 2017

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30) -with stop motion video recipe!

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30)

Though this beef and broccoli dish has become one of our favorite meals, it’s something I’ve held off posting because it almost seems too easy to qualify as a recipe. But sometimes, simple, easy, and delicious is just what’s needed, especially with how complicated life can be on AIP. And since I’ve been making this recipe almost weekly for the past few months, it’s time I shared it ;)

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30)

The Beef and Broccoli recipe comes together pretty quickly with minimal prep and minimal planning ahead AND minimal clean up. All ingredients are ones I generally keep on hand. With only a little extra time, the recipe can be easily doubled or tripled.

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30)


The ingredients are economically-priced. It travels well. It’s delicious warm or cold. It freezes well. I find my body really likes the ratio of protein/carbs/fat, plus it’s veggie heavy and features gut-healthy sauerkraut. And it’s just plain tasty!

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30)

For fun, I’ve also created a stop motion video of this recipe. While it isn’t possible to make this meal in 30 seconds like the video, it is possible to make it under an hour!



Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30) 
yields 4 servings 

For the roasted broccoli
Two 16 oz bags of frozen broccoli
5 tablespoons olive oil (or other AIP fat of choice)
1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic

For the roasted sweet potatoes
1 large (around 1 to 1.25 pounds) white sweet potato
2 tablespoons olive oil (or other AIP fat of choice)

For the beef
1 pound grass fed ground beef (85/15, if possible; see note below if starting with frozen ground beef)
2 tablespoons coconut aminos

For serving
Farmhouse Culture garlic dill pickle saurkraut (or make your own with this recipe, though I have not tried it…)
Smoked salt  (or other finishing salt of your choice)
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper
  2. For the roasted broccoli: spread the frozen broccoli on one of the prepared baking sheets. Drizzle with oil & and sprinkle with the granulated garlic. Roast in the preheated oven, on a middle rack, for 50 minutes. After 25 minutes of roasting, stir the broccoli & continue roasting. 
  3. For the roasted sweet potatoes: cube the sweet potato (no need to peel), spread on the second baking sheet, and drizzle with oil. Roast in the preheated oven, on a bottom rack, for 40 minutes. After 20 minutes of roasting, stir the potatoes & switch the broccoli to the bottom and the sweet potatoes to the middle rack. 
  4. For the beef: After the broccoli & sweet potatoes have been stirred once, heat a cast iron skillet (I use my Lodge cast iron skillet) over medium high heat. Add the beef and coconut aminos to the pan. Brown until the ground beef is cooked through. Set aside until the broccoli & sweet potatoes are done. 
  5. To assemble: add the browned beef, roasted broccoli, and roasted sweet potatoes to a large bowl. Toss to combine. 
  6. To serve: portion onto plates. Top with Farmhouse Culture garlic dill pickle sauerkraut (I like about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of sauerkraut on mine, but use less, if you prefer) and a generous sprinkle of smoked salt
  7. Store leftovers in the refrigerator or freezer. 
Notes:
  • If you’re starting with frozen ground beef, quick thaw it in warm water, while the vegetables are roasting, until the edges are soft—don’t worry if the middle is still a bit frozen… it will finish thawing in the skillet. Just make sure to use the quick-thawed beef immediately (i.e. don’t save it for another use). Alternately, thaw the beef in cold water or in the refrigerator if it isn’t to be used right away. 
  • If not cooking the ground beef in a cast iron skillet (or if a lower fat content beef is used), a little additional fat may be needed to keep the beef from sticking to the pan. 
  • Feel free to play with the ratios of beef/broccoli/sweets in this recipe based on your preferences (or what ingredients you have on hand). 
  • This recipe is NOT sponsored by Farmhouse Culture…. I just really love their sauerkraut! 

Beef and Broccoli (AIP, Paleo, Whole30)

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)

Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)

I’m not really a big Super Bowl (or football) person, though I do love a good Super Bowl party, mainly for the food, time with friends, and the commercials. This year, things will be much different, since we’ve moved to the middle of New England Patriots territory & they happen to be playing in the 2017 Super Bowl. Let me tell you…. people around here take their NFL football *very* seriously.

Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)

While I might feel more inclined to cheer for a particular team this year, I’m still most excited about the food! Specifically, I’m excited about making some AIP/Paleo options to share with our new friends. Last year, I made plantain chip chicken in nugget form, cutting chicken breasts into pieces before coating them in the plantain chip crust & baking them on a rack. I also made the red sangria mocktail from The Healing Kitchen, and some amazing paleo brownies from Joshua Weissman/Slim Palate (the brownies require an egg & chocolate reintro; I also subbed coconut oil for the butter). All super delicious. (haha, pun intended!)

Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)

I’m still debating exactly what I’ll take to this year’s party, but these loaded sweet potato fries are a serious contender. I first made them on a whim last summer for one of our burger nights & they were such a fun twist on normal sweet potato fries. Plus the arugula pesto they’re topped with adds some extra veggie power.

Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)

If you’re looking for some other party food ideas, whether for yourself or to share with others, here are a few more options:


Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo) 
Yields 2 generous servings; batch can be easily doubled or tripled for a larger group 

For the Fries:
1 pound white sweet potatoes (I prefer Hannah)
28 g (2 tablespoons) duck fat, melted
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 F. 
  2. Wash and cut the sweet potato into thin fry-shaped pieces, 1/4 to 1/2 inch in width. 
  3. Pour the melted duck fat into a bowl, add the sweet potato fries, and toss to coat. 
  4. Arrange the fries on an un-lined rimmed baking sheet (I used a quarter sheet), making sure there is a little space between each fry. Dust the fries with sea salt & garlic powder.
  5. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, then remove the pan from the oven and carefully flip the fries over. Roast for an additional 10 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown. While the fries are roasting, prepare the toppings (see below). 

To Assemble: 
1 batch of sweet potato fries (see above)
2 tablespoons arugula pesto, plus additional for dipping, if desired
3 strips of bacon, cooked and crumbled
1 tablespoon thinly sliced scallion
1 to 2 teaspoons cilantro leaves
sprinkling of smoked Maldon sea salt

  1. Just before serving, drizzle the roasted sweet potato fries with the arugula pesto. Top with the crumbled bacon, sliced scallion, and cilantro leaves. Sprinkle with smoked Maldon to taste. Serve with additional arugula pesto for dipping, if desired. 
Loaded Sweet Potato Fries (AIP & Paleo)


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Friday, December 9, 2016

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

My Grandma Vein is a really fantastic baker. She makes wonderful treats for all holidays, but especially during the Christmas season. One of my favorite christmas cookies is her spritz cookies, a butter cookie dough pressed through a cookie press into different shapes. Some people flavor the cookie dough with vanilla and some with almond—Grandma’s spritz recipe uses vanilla. She would leaves some of the dough naturally colored and colors part of it red and green. She also would sprinkle the pressed cookie dough with various colored sanding sugars and sprinkles before baking.

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

My AIP variation might look and taste a little different, but the first test batch cookie I popped into my mouth was like tasting a memory of Christmases past. Despite using palm shortening in lieu of butter, they still have a "buttery" flavor; they also have some lovely notes of maple and just a hint of coconut.

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

Instead of pressing the dough through a cookie press, I chose to pipe it with a pastry bag fitted with a large start tip into rosettes and wreath shapes—I couldn’t justify buying (or storing) a new cookie press & I’m not sure if my vintage press has any gluten remnants.

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

I didn't have many ideas for natural ways to color the dough, but I did add matcha green tea powder to the dry ingredients of one batch & it worked really well, though it does make the cookies taste like green tea. I suspect a few drops of beet juice might work well to make a more red/pink dough; however, I have a sensitivity to beets so I have not tried it out. To make the wreaths look more like actual wreaths (and less like piped circles), I added some chopped dried cranberries (apple-juice-sweetened) and a tiny sprinkle of turbinado/raw sugar.

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

Because these cookies are so delicious, I’ve purposely made the batch really small—depending on how big they’re piped, you should be able to get around 16 cookies. If you’re one with lots of willpower, even around lots of delicious AIP cookies, make a double batch :)

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten-free)

Happy Baking! PS if you’d like to make the AIP gingersnaps pictured on the cookie platter, make sure you grab a copy of my e-book “Holiday Sweet Treats.

Spritz Cookies (AIP, Paleo, Gluten Free) 
yields around 16 cookies

64 grams(1/4 cup) palm shortening
39 grams (2 tablespoons) Grade A dark maple syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
23 grams (3 tablespoons +1 teaspoon) coconut flour 
25 grams (3 tablespoons +1 teaspoon) tapioca starch
27 grams (3 tablespoons +1 teaspoon) arrowroot
3/4 teaspoon gelatin
1/8 teaspoon paleo baking powder (recipe follows) 
pinch of sea salt
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Fit a pastry bag with a large star tip (I used a Wilton bag fitted with an 824 Ateco tip). 
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, cream together the palm shortening with the maple syrup and the vanilla extract with a silicone spatula until well combined. If the palm shortening is too solid to properly mix—mine typically is during the winter—allow the ingredients to warm up slightly on the preheating stove. A hand mixer may also be used. 
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the coconut flour, tapioca, arrowroot, gelatin, paleo baking powder, and sea salt. 
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the shortening/maple/vanilla and mix until well combined. 
  5. Transfer the dough to the prepared pastry bag. Pipe the dough into rosettes, starting from the center & swirling outward. Draw circles as guides on the bottom of the parchment paper, if needed. Leave a little space between the cookies to allow them to puff a little during the baking process. 
  6. Bake the cookies in the preheated oven for 6 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for an additional 2 to 3 minutes, or until the cookies are just starting to turn golden on the edges. 
  7. Allow the cookies to cool completely on the pan before serving. 
  8. Store cookies in a single layer in an airtight container at room temperature or in the freezer. Leftover cookies may soften, so re-crisp in a warm oven, if needed, before serving. 
Matcha Wreath Variation
Same ingredients as above with the addition of:
A heaping 1/4 teaspoon of matcha green tea powder
Apple juice sweetened dried cranberries, chopped
Turbinado/raw sugar
  • Make the same recipe as above, adding a heaping 1/4 teaspoon of matcha green tea powder to the dry ingredients. Mix the green tea variation dough with a hand mixer too, just to ensure there are no tiny lumps of matcha. 
  • Pipe the dough into rings & press chopped dried cranberries into the rings. Sprinkle a little turbinado sugar over the wreaths. 
  • Bake as instructed above, though the wreaths may bake more quickly depending on how they thick they are piped, so watch them carefully. 
Paleo Baking Powder
81 grams (1/2 cup) cream of tartar 
55 grams (1/4 cup) baking soda
30 grams (1/4 cup) arrowroot or tapioca 
  1. Sift together the cream of tartar, baking soda, and arrowroot/tapioca.
  2. Store in an airtight jar. Use wherever baking powder is used. 

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Monday, November 21, 2016

Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo)

Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo)

Thanksgiving is only a couple days away, and I’m in full prep mode. But even if you’re waiting until the last minute to make the big Thanksgiving dinner, you can still have easy, delicious cranberry sauce, in a matter of minutes thanks to my favorite appliance, the Instant Pot.

Like the past two years, we are dry brining and butterflying a pastured turkey again, though because I can’t have dairy, we baste ours with a combination of bacon grease, sauvignon blanc wine & homemade turkey stock. I’ve actually chosen to do two birds this year because of the number of family members visiting and I wanted to make sure we’d have leftovers too! I find that cranberry sauce is not only a delicious condiment for the Thanksgiving table, but one that also can help mask the slight “gamey” flavor of a pastured turkey. It’s also delicious spread on sweet potato lefse, as well as on top of homemade 2-ingredient coconut yogurt.

Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo)

In addition to the turkey, lefse, and this cranberry sauce, we’ll also be having my starch-free gravy, mashed white sweet potatoes, sweet potato casserole with tigernuts, roasted brussels sprouts with bacon/balsamic/dried cranberries (adapted from “The Healing Kitchen”), refrigerator pickles, a green bean casserole that I hope to share more about in a future post. And, of course, pie! Paleo pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and an AIP apple galette (adapted from the pear galette in my e-book “Holiday Sweet Treats”. In the name of stress reduction, since stress is one of my biggest autoimmune triggers, I’ll have made everything, except the turkey and gravy, in advance and will only need to re-heat things before we eat.

If you don’t already have an Instant Pot, this cranberry sauce can be made on the stove—just simmer all the ingredients until the cranberries pop & the sauce thickens slightly. And I highly recommend checking Amazon and other retailers to see if the Instant Pot goes on sale on Black Friday or Cyber Monday :)

Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo)

Have a wonderful holiday. May you all enjoy spending time with friends and family. And may the leftovers be plentiful! :)

Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo) 
yields just shy of one quart jar of sauce

20 ounces frozen cranberries
215 grams (approx 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) honey (I prefer to use orange blossom honey)
1 tablespoon mandarin orange zest
3/4 cup mandarin orange juice
1/4 cup filtered water
1 cinnamon stick

  1. Combine all the ingredients in the stainless steel insert of the Instant Pot. Close and lock the lid, ensuring the vent is set to sealing. 
  2. Press {Manual} and reduce the time to 8 minutes.
  3. Once the time is up, allow the pressure to release naturally. 
  4. Remove the lid, stir, and allow to cool. Pour into a quart jar (or several small jars) and refrigerate until ready to eat. The sauce will thicken as it cools. The flavor continues to develop as it sits in the refrigerator, so plan to make this sauce a few days in advance, if possible. 

Notes:

  • I’ve tested this recipe only with frozen cranberries, since I can find them at Whole Foods year-round. But you should be able to substitute fresh cranberries.  
  • You may be tempted to reduce the amount of honey in the recipe, but I must warn you, even with 215 grams (over 1/2 a cup), the sauce is still a bit tart! 
  • Regular orange zest/juice may be substituted for the mandarin orange zest/juice. 
Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce (AIP & Paleo)


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after an Amazon link is clicked with no additional cost to you. Thanks for your support.